Conservation and restoration genomics workshop for field practitioners

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email

This workshop is in the past. To be notified of future workshops subscribe to the ReCER Newsletter. 

Subscribe

* indicates required

Genomic information can improve the effectiveness of recovery programs for threatened plants, from informing resilient restoration practices to establishing evolutionarily representative ex situ collections.

Simple genomic studies should be viewed as an initial step in decision-making, as they inform long-term recovery efforts in multiple ways. 

We introduce and explain simple, standardised workflows that will guide efficient planning and application of genetic information across disparate projects and illustrate these with relevant examples.

Numbers limited. 

Relevant publication: A conservation genomics workflow to guide practical management actions

Date and time

Tue 10th May 2022,
9:30 am – 4:00 pm AEST

Location

Maiden Theatre,
The Royal Botanic Garden Sydney
Mrs Macquaries Road, Sydney. 

Draft program

 

9.15 am

9.30

10.00

10.30

11.00

11.30

12.30 pm

1.00

1.30

2.30

3.30

4.00

Tea and coffee

Introduction to workshop

Knowledge Infrastructure for biodiversity management (Maurizio Rossetto)

Genetics for conservation: concepts, theory, and examples (Jason Bragg)

Break

Some relevant threatened species examples (Samantha Yap)

Germplasm collections: seed collecting and seed production areas (Marlien van der Merwe)

A genomics era myrtle rust management strategy (Stephanie Chen)

Lunch (provided)

General discussion and Q&A session

Sampling techniques and managing data

Close

For more information contact Maurizio Rossetto, Head of Research Centre for Ecosystem Resilience (ReCER)

Related Posts

Sampling plant material for genetic analysis

Working with plant genetics.

The genetics revolution is changing the way we study nature. Millions of years of evolution has taken plant species on a fascinating journey of change and adaptation. A plant’s story is hidden in its DNA, now we have to tools to read that story.

Read More »